Watercoloring a large stamp set to be the focal point

Happy New Year everybody! Well, we’re in 2020 and it’s time to look forward to new opportunities, new techniques and learn some new skills! Since the next big holiday is Valentine’s Day, I decided to break out my watercolor set and my large “Hello Darling” stamp set from Simon Says Stamp. I felt like this will be the right focal point for these cards. This is 6 x 8 stamp set so it’s just the right size for an A2 card.

The stamp set was Simon’s theme in April of last year and it came with the card kit, but I thought it would be perfect for Valentine’s Day! I used Bristol Smooth watercolor paper for these cards and cut them down to 4″ x 5-1/4″ for my panels.

Sticking with the traditional “love” colors, my plan was to go with a mix of red and pink. I knew I wanted one card to have a bold mix of pink over red and the reverse that for the second card. But first, I needed to prep my panels with an embossing powder tool so I could heat emboss my stamp. I used Gina K. Design’s fine white embossing powder after stamping with Versamark. I, then added spritzed water over my panel and used an #11 brush to add pink coloring. I held my brush diagonally from right to left as I added color but not to cover the whole panel. I cleaned my brush and took some of the red paint and added it. I loved watching how the heat embossing resisted the watercolor and seeing the paint moving along the panel! It’s pretty exciting stuff!

Watercoloring a large stamp set to be the focal point
Watercoloring a large stamp set to be the focal point

I kept adding more color between the pink and red, allowing it to dry in between. I decided not to use my heat gun to speed up the drying time. I really wanted to take my time. After I was happy with the final look, it was time to pick out a sub-sentiment (is that a word?!) I have used Simon’s large sentiment strips but they’re black letters on white and that would just blend too much on these cards since I knew I was going to have a lot of white showing. I contacted them about making reverse sentiment strips where you have white letters on black. And guess what? CZ Design created “Reverse Love” sentiment strips… ahhh Perfect Timing!

These strips saves so much time cause you don’t need to heat emboss the sentiments, just cut them out to have a bunch to have on hand! When I saw the “wanna snuggle?” I was all in love! So, I decided to use it. Before adding it, I wanted something else for the card. It needed a little something something! Well, I have bunch of assorted colors of ribbon that I wanted to use so I attached a pink on my card panel and then adhered the panel to Neenah 110 lb. solar white card base. I’m not good a tying bows but I think these came out okay!

Watercoloring a large sentiment stamp to be the focal point
Watercoloring a large stamp set to be the focal point

For my 2nd card design, the reversed the painting process and focused on adding pink with a touch of red showing through plus, I concentrated brushing from the top left to the bottom right but again not covering the entire panel. I was really happy how these turned out.

After they had completely dried, I wanted to add some dimension so I grabbed my ribbon, cut some fun foam to just slightly smaller than my card panels. I glued the foam to the panel and then taped the ribbon around all the foam. I then glued the panel to the card base and tied my bows. The last thing was to add my sub-sentiment strip and pick out an envelope! BAM, done!

So basically, a large stamp set can be the focal point of a card and really look beautiful. Heat embossing resist is one of my favorite techniques and it works for watercoloring and ink blending. Both cards are in our Shop and ready to go to new homes!

List of Supplies:

Below are links to the products I used and some of them are affiliate links meaning if you purchase through them, I’ll earn a small commission and it is no extra cost to you. Your purchasing helps support our small business and we appreciate that so much! – Kim

Watercoloring a large stamp set to be the focal point